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Peachy-keen
53 Torre Crescent
Bradford
West Yorkshire BD6 3PE
Phone: 07568551495
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My Peachy-Keen Blog

by Claire Seavers

A timetable is essential.  

A timetable let’s you and the children know what is expected and when.  However, your timetable will look considerably different to that of a usual 6-hour school day.  Let’s face it, with having fewer children than a usual class of 30, you will be surprised at how much you can get done in just a morning.  The most important thing is to make it your own.  Look at what works for you and your family.


Short and sweet wins the day.  

When it comes to setting time scales, keep it short.  With my 2 little ones we do 15 to 20 minutes focus time and then play.  Some of the play is linked to the focus activity, but only if the children are still engaged.  For older children, maybe keep the focus to 30 minutes.  Remember, you will be surprised at how much you will get through.

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A New Challenge

We are in this together. March 20th 2020


Oh my!  The world today seems a very scary place.  I never thought my first post would be this…  I walked the twins to school this morning for the last time in, what could be, a very long time.  They seemed blissfully unaware of the frightening situation that seems to be all around us at the minute.  A pandemic like you or I have never seen, but only learnt about at school.  


As most people now, I was a primary school teacher before embarking on this Peach-Keen adventure.  So, when I returned home, I set to work. I dug out all my old resources, looked through old planning that, for some reason I still had saved on old memory sticks... the thought of the children missing possibly a whole term of school worried me.  Our little Twin 2 really needed that term to show a good level of development and to come off the gas pedal now scared me.  I have to say I really enjoyed being stuck in again.  It made me realise just how much I had missed it.


The prospect of having our little ones at home, moving their learning on didn’t faze me.  However, I know there are some parents out there wondering how their little primary school age cherubs are going to achieve, or at least not fall behind.  So, for all you superstar Mamas and Papas out there stepping up to the challenge of ‘home schooling’, you are not alone.  Here are some of my top tips for success.




Learning styles play an important role.  

In the beginning weeks, you may want to closely observe your children and take note of ‘how’ they learn.  Some children well listening, others are hands on learners and love doing, some are visual and will thrive by watching, and finally there are those who can sit and read and take in all the information that way.  Our Twin 2 is a mixture of hands on and visual, but Twin 1 is a listener and hands on, so I try to accommodate these to help them grasp the learning.


Learning through play.

As an Early Years teacher, I can’t emphasise how important it is to let your little ones PLAY!  Play is the main way children learn and I think as they progress through Primary School not enough time is dedicated to letting them play (but that’s a different discussion).   It is through play that children engage and interact with the world around them.  It allows them to use their imagination, allows their creativity to grow, and is incredibly important for their social and emotional development.  And if Mummy and Daddy can join in their play it adds to the fun and learning.

Make time for reading!  

Our two hear stories every day and are often picking up books to read during their play.  We have a good selection on our bookshelf, but choice is key.  There are several places where you can listen to stories or read stories online, such as Oxford Owls website, some of which are at the children’s reading level.  Even older children enjoy listening to stories as much as reading them themselves.  It allows them to concentrate on the story content and lets them access stories that they may not be able to enjoy independently.


Learning from home looks different for every child and every household, and it is important to make it work for you. Be prepared to try new things, but if it’s not working be prepared to change it up.  Keep lines of communication open with other parents from your school and your friends.  They may have good tips and ideas to try.  It’s all about being flexible.  Stay safe and well, you’ve got this Superstars!

The prospect of having our little ones at home, moving their learning on didn’t faze me.  However, I know there are some parents out there wondering how their little primary school age cherubs are going to achieve, or at least not fall behind.  So, for all you superstar Mamas and Papas out there stepping up to the challenge of ‘home schooling’, you are not alone.  Here are some of my top tips for success.


Important: Your home is not the school.  

Firstly, it’s important to remember that you do not need to reproduce the classroom in your home, and you do not need to search the Internet or rack your brains to plan and prepare lessons.  Most schools have been preparing for this for several weeks now.  They have been planning virtual lessons, daily challenges and are preparing to implement these over the coming weeks, so learning content should pretty much be taken care of by the teachers.